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07. Transmission of numbers in radiotelephony

Wikis > Communications > 07. Transmission of numbers in radiotelephony
5.2.1.4 Transmission of numbers in radiotelephony

5.2.1.4.1 Transmission of numbers

5.2.1.4.1.1 All numbers, except as prescribed in 5.2.1.4.1.2, shall be transmitted by pronouncing each digit separately.

    Note. The following examples illustrate the application of this procedure (see 5.2.1.4.3.1 for pronunciation).
aircraft call signs transmitted as
CCA 238 Air China two three eight
OAL 242 Olympic two four two
flight levels transmitted as
FL 180 FL 200
flight level one eight zero flight level two zero zero
headings transmitted as
100 degrees heading one zero zero
080 degrees heading zero eight zero
wind direction and speed transmitted as
200 degrees 70 knots wind two zero zero degrees seven zero knots
160 degrees 18 knots gusting 30 knots wind one six zero degrees one eight knots gusting three zero knots
transponder codes transmitted as
2 400 squawk two four zero zero
4 203 squawk four two zero three
runway/th>

transmitted as
27 runway two seven
30 runway three zero
altimeter setting transmitted as
1 010 QNH one zero one zero
1 000 QNH one zero zero zero
5.2.1.4.1.2 All numbers used in the transmission of altitude, cloud height, visibility and runway visual range (RVR) information, which contain whole hundreds and whole thousands, shall be transmitted by pronouncing each digit in the number of hundreds or thousands followed by the word HUNDRED or THOUSAND as appropriate. Combinations of thousands and whole hundreds shall be transmitted by pronouncing each digit in the number of thousands followed by the word THOUSAND followed by the number of hundreds followed by the word HUNDRED.

altitude transmitted as
800 eight hundred
3 400 three thousand four hundred
12 000 one two thousand
cloud height transmitted as
2 200 two thousand two hundred
4 300 four thousand three hundred
visibility transmitted as
1 000 visibility one thousand
700 visibility seven hundred
runway visual range transmitted as
600 RVR six hundred
1 700 RVR one thousand
seven hundred
5.2.1.4.1.3 Numbers containing a decimal point shall be transmitted as prescribed in 5.2.1.4.1.1 with the decimal point in appropriate sequence being indicated by the word DECIMAL.

    Note 1. The following examples illustrate the application of this procedure:
Number Transmitted as
100.3 ONE ZERO ZERO DECIMAL THREE
38 143.9 THREE EIGHT ONE FOUR THREE DECIMAL NINE
    Note 2. For identification of VHF frequencies the number of digits used after the decimal point are determined on the basis of the channel spacing (5.2.1.7.3.4.3 refers to frequencies separated by 25 kHz, 5.2.1.7.3.4.4 refers to frequencies separated by 8.33 kHz).
    Note 3. The channelling/frequency pairing relationship for 8.33 kHz and 25 kHz is found in Table 4-1 (bis), Volume V.
5.2.1.4.1.4 PANS. When transmitting time, only the minutes of the hour should normally be required. Each digit should be pronounced separately. However, the hour should be included when any possibility of confusion is likely to result.

    Note. The following example illustrates the application of this procedure when applying the provisions of 5.2.1.2.2:
Time Statement
0920 (9:20 A.M.) TOO ZE-RO or
ZE-RO NIN-er TOO ZE-RO
1643 (4:43 P.M.) FOW-er TREE or
WUN SIX FOW-er TREE
5.2.1.4.2 Verification of numbers

5.2.1.4.2.1 When it is desired to verify the accurate reception of numbers the person transmitting the message shall request the person receiving the message to read back the numbers.

5.2.1.4.3 Pronunciation of numbers

When the provisions of 5.2.1.2.2 (see below) are applied, numbers shall be transmitted using the following pronunciation:

Numeral or numeral element Pronunciation
0 ZE-RO
1 WUN
2 TOO
3 TREE
4 FOW-er
5 FIFE
6 SIX
7 SEV-en
8 AIT
9 NIN-er
Decimal DAY-SEE-MAL
Hundred HUN-dred
Thousand TOU-SAND
    Note. The syllables printed in capital letters in the above list are to be stressed; for example, the two syllables in ZE-RO are given equal emphasis, whereas the first syllable of FOW-er is given primary emphasis.

Source: ICAO Annex 10.2

 
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